3 Common Distractions Towards Success And How To Eliminate Them

Every day we are bombarded with distractions that keep us from achieving our goals in the time we set them out for. Some distractions, like family, roommates, and the inner circle, are unavoidable and require tact to work through. Others, like the internet, are completely avoidable and just takes a high degree of self-control to conquer. Here are three common distractions that keep us from achieving our goals and how we can work through or around them to accomplish what we set out to do.

1. The Internet

The internet is the event horizon of a black hole: once you’ve reached a certain point, there’s no coming back. In terms of distractions, what that means is once you’ve allowed a certain amount of negative or useless material into your mind, you’re doomed to be pulled into a vortex of negativity and unproductivity the rest of the day.

Keep in mind that negativity and unproductivity are two different things. Negativity can lead to unproductivity, but positive experiences, such as getting online with friends for games during a time designated for self-development, is also unproductive.

Social media, Facebook in particular, is usually the culprit for wasted time. It’s scrolling interface, content variety, and mass appeal make it nearly impossible to stay away from for more than twenty four hours. YouTube is a close second, with endless video and streaming content making it too easy to get sucked into for hours.

Although it’ll take an astounding degree of self-control, avoiding social media is indeed possible. The key is organization. Set time away specifically for social media. Doing so and sticking to your schedule keeps you from constantly scrolling the internet throughout the day, throwing away countless productive hours. I usually set my time to check social media in between my first work session (30-minute break) and two hours before bedtime.

2. Your Job

We often tend to bring our troubles from work home with us. On-the-job worries such as deadlines and difficult bosses and co-workers can make leaving work at work easier said than done. However, it’s still critical to your peace and productivity to check all of your problems at the office door.

To help with this, try meditation. Meditation helps you move beyond thought without putting weight to it. At work, of course you have to think about the work you’re doing. But when you’re off the clock and driving home, let all thoughts of work loose and focus instead on the good that’s on your way home. Think about that idea you’re now able to dig deeper into, or the chapter of that self-development book you’re able to finish.

Even if it’s just for five minutes, at least give your mind the chance to get away from your job. If your 9-5 is not a bigger part of your future, ask yourself why you’re stressing so hard. If it is, understand that worrying literally does nothing but take you away from the present moment, robbing you of any opportunity to come up with a solution. If it’s that important, stay at work and take care of it or come home, give yourself a breather, then finish it at home. If not, set away an hour of “worry” time two hours before bed and direct the rest of your time towards productivity and being in the moment.

Image result for dealing with distractions

3. Your Home Life

Whether you’re a father and trying to juggle children, a husband/boyfriend needing to please his other half, or you have multiple roommates working different hours of the day, home distractions can be a major factor in any road blocks towards your goals. It’s the trickiest of distractions of all to handle because they involve loved ones or ones in your inner circle.

Regardless of relationship, boundaries are critical. Without them, miscommunication occurs, leading to confusion, hurt feelings, frustration, and anger among all parties involved. What you should do is establish “You” time where nothing or no one is allowed to penetrate your wall of concentration. Outside of children and emergencies, that time is reserved for you and should be treated as if you’re punched in at work and on the clock. Friends and family should know not to interrupt you during these hours. If they don’t, you’ll either need to be more firm establishing your boundaries or you’ll need to find somewhere more productive to work where your time and efforts are more respected.

Bottom Line: Distractions happen, but we have a choice how we handle them.

Distractions are going to occur. They’re inevitable as a matter of fact. The key to your own success and happiness, however, is what you choose to do with distractions. You can either succumb to them or overcome them. The choice is all yours. It just takes some guidance and remarkable self-control to achieve.

Copyright (c) 2019 vitaminvoyager.com

blogging

3 Things I’ve Learned Since Starting My Blog

Blogging is an Art

From the day I officially started my online blog (Feb 4, 2017) to this very moment typing, I can honestly say starting a blog is one of the best things I’ve decided to do in my life. Blogging gives me the freedom to be me, write in my own voice, and write about my own life experiences. It also gives me the freedom to demonstrate my expertise in my fields, holistic health, nutrition, fitness, writing, and veteran resources. Although there’s technically no way I can fail at this, as I can blog about whatever I want to blog about, if you’re goal-oriented, chances are you set some expectations. Here are a few expectations I set for myself, and my experience with them thus far.

1. Gaining Followers is Not as Easy as Sprinkling a Few Key Words Around

When I first began writing my first articles, I couldn’t stop raving about the benefits of learning SEO (Search Engine Optimization). Knowing even the basics of SEO can certainly result in an increase in organic traffic, but oftentimes than not, it takes time for a considerable increase. I was reading plenty of ebooks and different articles on the ins and outs of SEO, so naturally, I hyped it up in my head before actually waiting for the results I was envisioning. Each article I put time, heart, and soul into it (as we all do in our blogs), but I received nary a view in a single day sometimes, much less a visit. As I learned more about social media marketing, I started connecting my social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn, with my blog site. Doing this I immediately started to notice a spike in my visitors. But then the graph goes back to its regular, flat state about two days after the post and shares.

Needless to say, gaining followers is no walk in the park. It takes time, patience, research, hard work, and plenty of content to get noticed and gain regular followers. There will certainly be some inconsistencies in the beginning, but as you gain your voice and combine that with some basic SEO skills, you’ll see your efforts paying off.

2. Neither is Gaining Clients/Customers if You Are An Entrepreneur

I’ll be the first to admit: I underestimated just how challenging it would be to market myself as well as my services and products through writing. I’ve always loved to write ever since I learned cursive in the third grade. English, Writing, and Literature also happened to be my strongest areas in school. This meant blogging about a few things here and there and posting them on my popular social media sites would generate followers and clients in no time, right?

Wrong.

I couldn’t have been more wrong. There is so much more to marketing your business than just having a website and posting a few blogs. Copious amounts of hours are poured into learning about SEO techniques, social media marketing, and business plans. Countless time is spent brainstorming different content. Sometimes those brainstorms are for taking your business in another direction, something you’ll notice will happen a few times throughout your venture if you’re an entrepreneur.

Some Categories Just Don’t Get as Much Love

Another thing you’ll quickly learn is that some categories will get more love than others, simply for what they are. For example, travel is a crowd-favorite. Nearly everybody loves to travel in some form or fashion. It’s also often a way to get away from daily struggles. With these reasons in mind, it’s no wonder travel blogs are chosen more often to read over say home tool blogs.

As a blogger, the best thing you can get out of this is just to blog about what comes to heart. I’ve gone a couple weeks at a time without blogging but then published three articles in a span of 36 hours on the same scale. I write my best work when I feel it in my very bones. It has to come from the soul. If I feel pressured to write, whether if it’s for freelance work or I feel obligated to keep up with my blog, then I won’t feel as inspired.

Just do you and write whatever you want to write about. Write however you want to write. Write when you want to. Write where you want to. Whenever you’re feeling inspired, just write. The blogs where you’re not focused on a popular category or what keywords you’re going to use, but instead on unique, original content true to yourself are the ones that generate the most interest.

I do not own the photo used for the featured image.

Copyright (c) 2017 Vitaminvoyager.com, All Rights Reserved

Getting out of the military

Ways To Be Successful Outside of the Military

Getting Out Of The Military Is Scary. . .

But it’s exciting. One of the first things that come to mind as your time nears and that DD214 slip is put in your hand is stability: Where is your next steady paycheck going to come from? How hard is it to hold a job in the civilian world? What about medical benefits and vacation? Will my pay be enough to sustain me since Uncle Sam is no longer paying for my roof? I know these were all questions that came to mind when I first got out of the Air Force in June 2012. I wound up going to school full-time and putting off my job search until a few years later when I separated from the California National Guard in August 2015.

One thing I will say; I wish I’d started the process sooner because I’d have even more experience now. There are so many opportunities for veterans it’s almost hard to remain without a job. As part of this series of blogs, I’ll be researching and interviewing veterans, the different jobs they have, and the routes they took to get those jobs. I’ll be interviewing single, married, divorced, and veterans with children to cover the different jobs and careers required for them to sustain themselves and/or their families. However, the jobs in this post are primarily for single veterans with no dependents, as the pay in these jobs is not enough to sustain a family. Here are some excellent jobs you can apply for once the shackles are off and you get your first taste of freedom!

1) Work For An Airline

Sometimes the thing you’ll miss the most when getting out of the military is the traveling. Whether you were Air Force, Army, Marine, or Navy, unless you CHOSE to stay close to home, Uncle Sam brought you somewhere you’d never been before. Many of us actually joined the military for the opportunity to travel. I know that was an excellent pitch by my recruiter when I enlisted in 2008.


This is why working for an airline is an excellent job and opportunity for the military travel bug at heart! I worked for Piedmont at American Airlines for about a year and a half, and I can honestly say it was the best job I’d ever held at that time. I was only part-time and didn’t qualify for the medical benefits or 401k, but the travel benefits were beyond amazing. You can travel on standby anywhere in the United States for free as long as seats are available. Furthermore, you can add a spouse OR domestic partner (girlfriend, roommate) to your travel list and they too travel for free! Well sort of. The seat is free, but the tax of their ticket comes out of your paycheck, which, by the way, is chunk change usually. I’m talking about like $20.

It should be noted that starting pay for a ramp or gate agent is usually minimum wage. When I first started at Sky Harbor in Phoenix, AZ, I started at minimum wage, which was $8.05/hr. Thankfully I was going to school and I was receiving my GI Bill money. In other words, this job is EXCELLENT if you are single and/or don’t have any children, or if you are with a spouse who makes a great deal of money doing. This way you can put your whole family on your travel benefits list and use the money you make from your hours at the job to spoil the fam bam!

You could always check for jobs and position availability here at www.jobs.aa.com. You can also check out other airlines, as many of them have very similar benefits and some start you off with more than minimum wage pay.

2) Security

Sure, this may sound like a “demotion,” but I’m here to tell you there is no job not worthy of taking when it puts money, and therefore food, on the table. Now bear in mind that this particular list is geared primarily towards single individuals with no kids. If you’re getting out of the military after 4-6 years, you’re still young and have plenty of time to figure out exactly what you want to do. In the meantime, great jobs like security are all over the place. Think about it; everyone needs security. You could do in-house security or go for a company who’s outsourcing security via contracting. Hospitals, schools, retail and grocery stores, and apartments/condominiums are great places to start looking for security jobs locally. When I got out of the military completely in 2015, my Air Force experience got me instantly hired for IPSA Security at the Phoenix Convention Center. If you live in a city with heavy public transportation services such as light rails or trains, they’re always looking for veterans to hire.


The pay working as a security guard varies. First, you’ll have to get your security guard card (check your local government laws on working as a guard and how to obtain your card). I only had to sit through an eight-hour course, most of the material of which I already knew from my military training and background. It wound up costing me about $75, as I had to get my fingerprints and background check and all that good stuff. Once all of that was completed, I got my card (I was already hired at the time), and was put to work immediately the following day. I started out making about $10/hr before receiving a $1 raise for both time (six months) and performance.

Security is an excellent job to have when you get out of the military because it’s fairly easy to get and the job itself is not that stressful. Of course, this all depends on where you work and who you work for. As a single man with no kids and a GI Bill to take care of other bills, what I was making as security walking around the convention center asking transients to leave (my least favorite part of this job), securing doors, and performing simple routine tasks was more than enough to be thankful for!

3) Grub Hub Delivery

When I first got out of the military, there was no Uber or Lyft. I started from scratch on my job search, attending resume shops and driving around the city handing out hard copies of my resume. Now all you have to do is have a car.

Literally.

Signing up for Uber and Lyft is excellent and you can really make good money on your own time and dime. Unfortunately, though, you can’t predict awful passengers. Enter Grub Hub, a contracting company that partners with restaurants that don’t normally deliver. The best part about Grub Hub is that you’re driving all alone and never have to pick up passengers. This means you can have your music up and cruise the city on your own time, enjoying life all while making money. It doesn’t get any better than that, right?


All you have to do to is sign up is have a vehicle, current insurance, a quick background check (mine was done in 24 hours), and fill out the online application. The pay varies, as times of the day, holidays, and weekends can all affect how many deliveries you make that day. Whenever I drive, usually for some extra money for a trip I’m planning, It’s for about six hours. On average I make between $75-$100 depending on tips. Now keep in mind that you’ll be driving around a lot, so take gas into consideration when adding up expenses. This is very handy money, especially when it’s just a few hours spent on the road in a day on your own time.

Plenty Of Opportunities Outside Of the Military

If you’re planning on getting out of the military or you’ve already gotten out and you’re just getting your feet wet in the civilian job world, hang in there! I know the mixture of worry, anxiety, and excitement can be overwhelming, but we have support, community, and plenty of resources to be successful outside of the military. Not to mention the skills gained in the military that transition to civilian jobs is unmatched.

The three excellent jobs I mentioned in this blog post are just a few of a slew of jobs I’ve been blessed to gain experience from. As I cull experience from other previous jobs and current jobs as well as gain more experience in my own business and services I’m growing, I will be writing more blog posts regarding this subject. What these three jobs all have in common is that they are perfect stop-gap jobs for the single person still finding out exactly what they want to do as a career. The pay is great, especially if you’re going to school, and all of these jobs offer some form of flexibility, especially Grub Hub. No matter what job you choose when you get out of the military, just remember that this is only the beginning of a wonderful experience. Most importantly, you have a support system and resources at your disposal if you’re willing to reach out and look for it!

For my Lifestyle Coaching services related to transitioning from military to civilian, please feel free to contact me at anthonyjrichard17@gmail.com. Otherwise, look for more articles like this here on Anthonyjrichard.com!

I do not own any photos in this blog post.

Copyright (c) 2017 Anthonyjrichard.com, All Rights Reserved